dynastylnoire:

strangeasanjles:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.

Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

(Article)

Gabriel tho!

Gabriel can take me up immediately

Our cultural fixation on female thinness is not an obsession with female beauty but an obsession with female obedience.

Naomi Wolf in The Beauty Myth  (via punkradical)

(Source: )

collectorsage:

Arrested Development Always Money In Banana Stand T-Shirt"How much clearer can I say, ‘There is always money in the banana stand!’?" - George Bluth Sr. If you’ve got an old family banana stand with $250,000 lining the…posted by Collector Sage

collectorsage:

Arrested Development Always Money In Banana Stand T-Shirt

"How much clearer can I say, ‘There is always money in the banana stand!’?" - George Bluth Sr. If you’ve got an old family banana stand with $250,000 lining the…

posted by Collector Sage

People without hope not only don’t write novels, but what is more to the point, they don’t read them. They don’t take long looks at anything, because they lack the courage. The way to despair is to refuse to have any kind of experience, and the novel, of course, is a way to have experience. The lady that only read books that improved her mind was taking a safe course—and a hopeless one. She’ll never know whether her mind is improved or not, but should she ever, by some mistake, read a great novel, she’ll know mighty well that something is happening to her.

Flannery O’Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose p. 78 (via habitofbeing)